Teaching and Parenting Philosophy

In any house or classroom, there are essential values that must be maintained in order for masters to bring maturity to their pupils.


The first value is honesty or integrity.


The rules must be followed and enforced. Good rules that are not enforced consistently and fairly will nullify any good intended. When there is consistency based on these pre-determined rules, trust is built, which ultimately leads to good relationships between master and pupil, and pupil and pupil.


The second value is proper acceptance.


There must be respect for each other, along with acceptance in the differences between levels of growth and personality within a framework of correct behavior. Improper behavior must not be accepted, for it will produce the opposite result intended. Proper acceptance to err and try again builds confidence, which ultimately leads to good relationships between master and pupil, and pupil and pupil.


The third value is tangible rewards for good behavior and effort.


Masters must tell the pupils why the rules and values prescribed are beneficial and right. Effort toward the goals of these rules and values must be encouraged through tangible rewards. At the same time, the master must never reward improper behavior, for it would encourage the opposite of what is intended. Tangible rewards for good behavior and effort produce motivation, which ultimately leads to good relationships between master and pupil, and pupil and pupil.


As you have noticed, the end goal of all three values is good relationships. That is because good relationships allow learning to flourish. Poor relationships hinder learning. Therefore, there are three action steps to take to ensure a positive home or classroom conductive to producing maturity in pupils.


1. Clearly explain, demonstrate, and expect the essential values.

2. Immediately punish the following: dishonesty, bullying, and apathy.

3. Maintain an agreement with superiors, if any, regarding these essential values (i.e. parents, co-teachers, spouses, supervisors).


The first value, honesty, precedes proper acceptance and the giving and receiving of meaningful rewards, ultimately creating an atmosphere of good relationships with the goal of producing maturity in pupils likened to that of their masters.


Concordantly, the proper place to start in creating an environment conducive to producing maturity is in outlining clear rules and expectations, and cultivating a culture of honesty and integrity toward them.


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